The Long Road

Imagine going on a relaxing bike drive with friends and family.  Everyone is driving together at the same speed.  It is a little cramped on the road,  but still a lot of fun.

Somewhere along the road, you get news about an urgent task that needs your attention (could be work related or personal). You immediately change gear and speed off in the direction of your task.

Soon you have left the big gang of people behind and are alone speeding faster
and faster.  In a while you get tired and lonely, but there is no one around to offer comfort. You keep moving along at the same speed,  hoping your friends and family will soon catch up with you.  They don’t catch up and you feel even more dejected.

Eventually one day you finish the task, you had set out to do. You are happy for the accomplishment but there is no one to celebrate the success with. You blame your family for not being there with you in this big moment.

After a few lonely years of blaming others for your lonliness, you give up your ego, forgive them and start searching for them. You go back the road you were once travelling with them, but you can’t find them anywhere. You remember the turns you took on the road but have no way of knowing which turns they took.

Even  though you achieved whatever you set out for, you are no longer happy. As you trace your steps back, somewhere on the road, you realise what went wrong.  If only you had communicated with your group before you set off, if only you had left markers along the way for someone to follow,  if only you had taken atleast one person along, if only you had not taken so long to retrace your steps;  life could’ve been a lot different.

Life is never about a choice between personal ambitions and family life. We can have both of these as long as we communicate and make time to take a few loved ones along, or at least leave marks on the road so that they can follow.